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Category: 3rd MEB
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Ships of the America and Essex Amphibious Ready Groups, and Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 3, sail in formation with the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force during exercise Noble Fusion, led by Combined Task Force 79 (3rd Marine Expeditionary Brigade) and CTF 76. Front row: Landing craft, utility from USS Essex (LHD 2). Second row, left to right: USS America (LHA 6), USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72), Essex. Third row, left to right: USS Dewey (DDG 105), JS Kongō (DDG 173), USS Mobile Bay (CG 53), USS Spruance (DDG 111). Back row, left to right: USS Ashland (LSD 48), USS Miguel Keith (ESB 5). Noble Fusion highlights that Navy and Marine Corps forward-deployed stand-in naval expeditionary forces can rapidly aggregate Marine Expeditionary Unit/Amphibious Ready Group teams at sea, along with a carrier strike group, as well as other joint force elements and allies, in order to conduct lethal sea-denial operations, seize key maritime terrain, guarantee freedom of movement, and create advantage for US, partner and allied forces. Naval Expeditionary forces conduct training throughout the year, in the Indo-Pacific, to maintain readiness. (U.S. Navy photo) - Ships of the America and Essex Amphibious Ready Groups, and Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 3, sail in formation with the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force during exercise Noble Fusion, led by Combined Task Force 79 (3rd Marine Expeditionary Brigade) and CTF 76. Front row: Landing craft, utility from USS Essex (LHD 2). Second row, left to right: USS America (LHA 6), USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72), Essex. Third row, left to right: USS Dewey (DDG 105), JS Kongō (DDG 173), USS Mobile Bay (CG 53), USS Spruance (DDG 111). Back row, left to right: USS Ashland (LSD 48), USS Miguel Keith (ESB 5). Noble Fusion highlights that Navy and Marine Corps forward-deployed stand-in naval expeditionary forces can rapidly aggregate Marine Expeditionary Unit/Amphibious Ready Group teams at sea, along with a carrier strike group, as well as other joint force elements and allies, in order to conduct lethal sea-denial operations, seize key maritime terrain, guarantee freedom of movement, and create advantage for US, partner and allied forces. Naval Expeditionary forces conduct training throughout the year, in the Indo-Pacific, to maintain readiness. (U.S. Navy photo)

PHILIPPINE SEA (Feb. 6, 2022) Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) 3rd Class Shelby Mann, from Udall, Kan., assigned to the forward-deployed amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA 6), signals a CH-47J Chinook helicopter from the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force to take off from the ship’s flight deck during Exercise Noble Fusion. Noble Fusion demonstrates that Navy and Marine Corps forward-deployed stand-in naval expeditionary forces can rapidly aggregate Marine Expeditionary Unit/Amphibious Ready Group teams at sea, along with a carrier strike group, as well as other joint force elements and allies, in order to conduct lethal sea-denial operations, seize key maritime terrain, guarantee freedom of movement, and create advantage for U.S., partner and allied forces. Naval Expeditionary forces conduct training throughout the year, in the Indo-Pacific, to maintain readiness. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Vincent E. Zline) - PHILIPPINE SEA (Feb. 6, 2022) Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) 3rd Class Shelby Mann, from Udall, Kan., assigned to the forward-deployed amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA 6), signals a CH-47J Chinook helicopter from the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force to take off from the ship’s flight deck during Exercise Noble Fusion. Noble Fusion demonstrates that Navy and Marine Corps forward-deployed stand-in naval expeditionary forces can rapidly aggregate Marine Expeditionary Unit/Amphibious Ready Group teams at sea, along with a carrier strike group, as well as other joint force elements and allies, in order to conduct lethal sea-denial operations, seize key maritime terrain, guarantee freedom of movement, and create advantage for U.S., partner and allied forces. Naval Expeditionary forces conduct training throughout the year, in the Indo-Pacific, to maintain readiness. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Vincent E. Zline)

A U.S. Marine with Maritime Raid Force, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), cuts into a makeshift wall using a power saw aboard the USS Miguel Keith (ESB 5) to begin a Visit, Board, Search, and Seizure (VBSS) mission during operation Noble Fusion in the Philippine Sea, Feb. 5, 2022. VBSS training reinforces the Marine Corps’ presence within ocean waters by having a team at the ready to act in a moment’s notice. Noble Fusion demonstrates that Navy and Marine Corps forward-deployed stand-in naval expeditionary forces can rapidly aggregate Marine Expeditionary Unit/Amphibious Ready Group teams at sea, along with a carrier strike group, joint forces and allies in order to conduct lethal sea-denial operations, seize key maritime terrain, guarantee freedom of movement, and create advantage for US, partner and allied forces. Naval Expeditionary forces conduct training throughout the year, in the Indo-Pacific, to maintain readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Cesar Ronaldo Alarcon) - A U.S. Marine with Maritime Raid Force, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), cuts into a makeshift wall using a power saw aboard the USS Miguel Keith (ESB 5) to begin a Visit, Board, Search, and Seizure (VBSS) mission during operation Noble Fusion in the Philippine Sea, Feb. 5, 2022. VBSS training reinforces the Marine Corps’ presence within ocean waters by having a team at the ready to act in a moment’s notice. Noble Fusion demonstrates that Navy and Marine Corps forward-deployed stand-in naval expeditionary forces can rapidly aggregate Marine Expeditionary Unit/Amphibious Ready Group teams at sea, along with a carrier strike group, joint forces and allies in order to conduct lethal sea-denial operations, seize key maritime terrain, guarantee freedom of movement, and create advantage for US, partner and allied forces. Naval Expeditionary forces conduct training throughout the year, in the Indo-Pacific, to maintain readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Cesar Ronaldo Alarcon)

PHILIPPINE SEA (Feb. 7, 2022) The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) sails in formation during exercise Noble Fusion. Ships of the America and Essex Amphibious Ready Groups and the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group, alongside the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force, participate in exercise Noble Fusion. Noble Fusion highlights that Navy and Marine Corps forward-deployed stand-in naval expeditionary forces can rapidly aggregate Marine Expeditionary Unit/Amphibious Ready Group teams at sea, along with a carrier strike group, as well as other joint force movement, and create advantage for U.S., partner and allied forces. Naval Expeditionary forces conduct training throughout the year, in the Indo-Pacific, to maintain readiness. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Thaddeus Berry) - PHILIPPINE SEA (Feb. 7, 2022) The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) sails in formation during exercise Noble Fusion. Ships of the America and Essex Amphibious Ready Groups and the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group, alongside the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force, participate in exercise Noble Fusion. Noble Fusion highlights that Navy and Marine Corps forward-deployed stand-in naval expeditionary forces can rapidly aggregate Marine Expeditionary Unit/Amphibious Ready Group teams at sea, along with a carrier strike group, as well as other joint force movement, and create advantage for U.S., partner and allied forces. Naval Expeditionary forces conduct training throughout the year, in the Indo-Pacific, to maintain readiness. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Thaddeus Berry)

U.S. Marine Corps 2nd Lt. Madison Hamby, an air support control officer with Marine Corps Air Support Squadron (MASS) 2, @1stmaw_marines is currently reinforcing 3d Marine Expeditionary Brigade’s (MEB) exercise Yama Sakura 81. Hamby works in the air coordination cell where her primary function is to source aircraft to support logistics, casualty evacuation, and close air support. - U.S. Marine Corps 2nd Lt. Madison Hamby, an air support control officer with Marine Corps Air Support Squadron (MASS) 2, @1stmaw_marines is currently reinforcing 3d Marine Expeditionary Brigade’s (MEB) exercise Yama Sakura 81. Hamby works in the air coordination cell where her primary function is to source aircraft to support logistics, casualty evacuation, and close air support. "There is a huge learning curve when it comes to this exercise," Hamby said. "It requires a higher level of thinking than usual, and you get to learn about the different joint forces and agencies involved.” Hamby, a native of Purlear, NC, has only been stationed in Okinawa for two months but has already found herself to be an important asset for Yama Sakura (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl Cameron Carawan).

Okinawa, Japan – The 3D Marine Expeditionary Brigade and the Japan Ground Self Defense Force’s Amphibious Rapid Deployment Brigade wrapped up Yama Sakura 81in multiple locations Dec. 12, 2021. Yama Sakura is an annual training exercise that focuses on the defense of Japan with bilateral planning, coordination, and interoperability between the Japanese Ground Self Defense Force and U.S. military units, including 3d MEB and the U.S. Army’s I Corps. The exercise highlights the continued commitment by both the United States and Japan to enhance American and Japanese combat readiness and integration while strengthening bilateral relationships. - Okinawa, Japan – The 3D Marine Expeditionary Brigade and the Japan Ground Self Defense Force’s Amphibious Rapid Deployment Brigade wrapped up Yama Sakura 81in multiple locations Dec. 12, 2021. Yama Sakura is an annual training exercise that focuses on the defense of Japan with bilateral planning, coordination, and interoperability between the Japanese Ground Self Defense Force and U.S. military units, including 3d MEB and the U.S. Army’s I Corps. The exercise highlights the continued commitment by both the United States and Japan to enhance American and Japanese combat readiness and integration while strengthening bilateral relationships.

         
 

3D Marine Expeditionary Brigade